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Routhierville's history, the valley


Know in the past under the name of Assemetquagan, Routhierville was founded by the first descendant of the village, Charles-Ernest Trudel.

The initial name of the mission was Assemetquagan, which means "the river that we discover after a curve" in the Micmac language.

The first inhabitants settled and celebrated their first mass in 1878  and the chapel and school were built in 1909.

The origin of the name Routhierville comes from the hamlet situated nearby. The name of this hamlet is in the honor of Alphonse Routhier who was the train station chief. In the years of colonization, the life of the inhabitants was centered around the train station  that was built in 1878 and also the Atlantic salmon fishing. At this time, the population used a boat to cross the Matapedia River.

  
                          
                                         



The construction of the bridge, which was initiated by was Alphonse Routhier, was a great step forward for the development of the community of Routhierville. It was (and still is) one of the few river crossings in the valley. 

The town-type bridge measures over 78 meters long and was built in 1931 at the cost of 13 000$. In 1953, it survived the spring thaw when the river ice rose to the same height as the bridge panelling.

In 1994, another spring freshet threatens the bridge and again repairs are made yet again, in 2008, the bridge is under nervous surveillance when the water level threatens the structure. 








In 2010, after some locals insisted that the bridge was protected by heritage Canada, 
the Transport ministry begins renovations on the  bridge which is now classified
as a historical monument.

These intensive renovations were carried until the end of December 2011. 







Alphonse Routhier builded this hôtel at the beginning of 1940. 

Cheef of the train station as of 1909, he organised the religious life, builded the first school and
was the spokesman when the inhabitants submitted demands to the authorities.

In the heydays, and over on the north side of the river, there stood a unique hotel, 
complete with a dining room and a dance hall which was a very popular spot for locals and outsiders. 

However, the hotel site did not make it through an 1980's fire, only the caabins are still there 




Matapedia valley 

The only intra-coastal region of the Gaspésie is the Matapedia Valley. You will find a considerable number of rivers and lakes, a unique paradise for fishermen and hunters.    


Renowned for its salmon fishing, it stands wild and steep in its southern part and stretches toward the north leaving space for the agriculture industry. 
This is where the Matapedia River has its source, namely, the Matapedia Lake. 

Traveling south, you will discover the charming agricultural village of Sainte-Therese-de-Merici, the majestic church of Saint-Moïse, beautiful Val-Brillant and its gothic style church located on the west shore of Matapedia Lake, the city of Amqui and the bridge of Anse-Saint-Jean.


Enjoy winter fun in Sainte-Irene, view the incredible Philomene Falls in Saint-Alexandre-des-Lacs, inspect Causapscal with its park at the meeting point of Causapscal and Matapedia Rivers and admire the renowned covered bridge of Routhierville.                   .


On the southern tip of the Valley, we enter a region of plateau..    

A unique place with breath-taking scenery overlooking the Ristigouche River (Soleil d'Or panoramic viewpoint in L'Ascension-de-Patapedia and Horizon de Reve in Saint-Alexis-de-Matapedia), numerous hiking trails, Picot Falls (Saint-Andre-de-Restigouche) and Matapédai, a lovely village with a history linked to salmon fishing.        
Don’t forget those inviting little villages that have a story, and a past to discover. 
Explore the valley and its secrets, witness spectacular sunrises and sun sets and view the rugged grandeur of the valley setting. Dont forget the auroras.

For more information on the Matapedia valley and recretional and cultural activities go to:  http://www.lamatapedia.ca./fr/visitez-la-matapedia.html.